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Biosimilars of abatacept

Abatacept is a modified antibody biological drug used to treat autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, by interfering with the function of particular cells (T-cells) in the immune system. This action modifies the inflammation and immune activity which cause the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Biosimilars approved in South Korea

Last update: 2 December 2016

In South Korea, the regulatory body for the approval of medicines, including biologicals and biosimilars, is the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS), formerly the Korean Food and Drug Administration.

Biosimilars of insulin glargine

Last update: 2 December 2016

Insulin glargine is a long-acting basal insulin analogue, given once daily to help control the blood sugar level of those with diabetes. It consists of microcrystals that slowly release insulin, giving a long duration of action of 18 to 26 hours. Insulin glargine is indicated for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults, adolescents and children aged two years and above.

Portuguese dermatologists’ position on the use of biosimilars in psoriasis

Biologicals have revolutionized the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, they impose a heavy burden on the healthcare system due to their high costs. In 2013, 27% of pharmaceutical sales were for biologicals. In 2015, two of the top five best-selling therapies were tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors, adalimumab and etanercept. Biosimilars, which may cost 25−30% less than the originator biological, thus represent a significant opportunity for savings to be made by both patients and healthcare systems.

Biosimilars approved in Europe

Last update: 25 November 2016

In the European Union (EU), a legal framework for approving biosimilars was established in 2003. This framework means that biosimilars can only be approved centrally via the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and not nationally.

Biosimilars of ranibizumab

Last update: 25 November 2016

Ranibizumab is a monoclonal antibody fragment created from the same parent mouse antibody as bevacizumab. Ranibizumab inhibits angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels) by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), a mechanism similar to bevacizumab [1].

Biosimilars of pegfilgrastim

Last update: 18 November 2016

Pegfilgrastim is a PEGylated form of the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) analogue filgrastim. It serves to stimulate the level of white blood cells (neutrophils). Pegfilgrastim treatment can be used to stimulate bone marrow to produce more neutrophils (white blood cells) to fight infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Biosimilars of filgrastim

Last update: 18 November 2016

Filgrastim is a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Filgrastim treatment can be used to stimulate the bone marrow to produce more neutrophils (white blood cells) to fight infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

Biosimilars of natalizumab

Natalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against the cell adhesion molecule α4-integrin. Natalizumab is believed to work by reducing the ability of inflammatory immune cells to attach to and pass through the cell layers lining the intestines and blood–brain barrier. Natalizumab is indicated for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (US and Europe) and Crohn’s disease (US).

Biosimilars of epoetin alfa

Last update: 4 November 2016

Epoetin alfa is a human erythropoietin produced in cell culture using recombinant DNA technology. It stimulates erythropoiesis (increases red blood cell levels) and is used to treat anaemia, commonly associated with chronic renal failure and cancer chemotherapy.

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