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Norway, biosimilars in different funding systems Posted 03/07/2015

Norway has approved biosimilar versions of the biologicals somatropin, epoetin, filgrastim and infliximab. Epoetin and filgrastim are included in a national tender for drugs used in hospitals, in which prices can be reduced by up to 89%. Regional health care is responsible for funding drugs used in hospitals and at home, and it is their responsibility for obtaining the best prices. The H-prescription system in Norway works best to maximize biosimilar competition, as exemplified by the approach taken for infliximab. However, the effect of existing biosimilars on prescriptions has varied [1].

Since their respective launches, filgrastim, somatropin and infliximab have taken different trajectories. The market share for filgrastiim is quite high, but the market share for somatropin has grown slowly, despite huge discounts offered on this drug. Sales of epoetin and filgrastim are still not comparable to sales of biologicals that do not have biosimilar competition, e.g. pegfilgrastim and darbepoetin, which dominate the market, and which have benefited from successful marketing campaigns.

In 2010, filgrastim was added to a ‘substitution list’, permitting pharmacists to automatically substitute the biological Neulasta with filgrastim, to stimulate price competition for use outside hospitals. Consequently, Amgen, the manufacturer of Neulasta, and the Association of the Pharmaceutical Industry in Norway took the Norwegian State to court. The court ruled that inclusion of filgrastim on the pharmacies’ substitution list was illegal, because the legislation supported only the inclusion of generics, but not biosimilars, on the substitution list. With the case of filgrastim, different levels of discounts have been achieved with and without a tender.

Somatropin is used for home treatment for which the national insurance system pays. Somatropin is not included in any tender, as pharmaceutical tenders in Norway cover only drugs paid for by hospitals. The prices for biosimilar somatropin have been 18‒29% below the average for the originator’s somatropin. The example of somatropin shows the effect of a biosimilar entry with low discounts, little follow-up, and no requirement to use the cheapest product. This has resulted in low market share even after several years on the market and despite intervention by the Norwegian Medicines Agency to recommend the cheapest product [2].

Biosimilar infliximab was launched in Norway in December 2013 (Remsima [Orion] and Inflectra [Hospira]), and has had a more rapid penetration into the Norwegian market compared to other biosimilars. Orion originally offered a 39% discount on Remsima compared with the Remicade tender price and has offered much higher discounts (72% price reduction) for 2015 [3].

The ongoing NOR-SWITCH study (results anticipated in 2016) aims to compare the originator drug infliximab (Remicade) with the biosimilar infliximab (Remsima) after switching from Remicade, and will generate safety and efficacy data about treatment with Remsima. It is believed that sales of Remsima may have been inhibited as a result of the study [4]. Nevertheless, experience in hospitals has been positive, and the considerably lower prices for Remsima have already boosted the market share for this drug.

Success post-launch of biosimilars requires a combination of actions. The tender process in Norway makes it easy for biosimilars to enter the healthcare system quickly if their price is sufficiently low, and to become the recommended drug for all approved indications. Close contact between specialists, clinicians, pharmacists, patient organizations and the pharmaceutical industry is an important foundation for success. Knowledge and guidance for use are also needed to generate successful biosimilar uptake.

Conflict of interest
The authors of the research paper [1] declared no conflicts of interest.

Editor’s comment
Readers interested to learn more about biosimilars pricing policies in Europe are invited to visit www.gabi-journal.net to view the following manuscript published in GaBI Journal:

What pricing and reimbursement policies to use for off-patent biologicals? – Results from the EBE 2014 biological medicines policy survey

Related articles
Norwegian study hopes to increase biosimilars uptake in Europe

Pharmacy chains in Norway do not stock generics

References
1. Asbjørn M. Norway, biosimilars in different funding systems. What works? Generics and Biosimilars Initiative Journal (GaBI Journal). 2015;4(2):90-2. doi:10.5639/gabij.2015.0402.018
2. Farmastat. Norsk Legemiddelstatistikk. Ledemidler (LM) Nordisk statistikk [homepage on the Internet]. [cited 2015 Jul 3]. Available from: www.farmastat.no/produkter/legemidler-(lm)/3/Nordisk%20Statistikk
3. GaBI Online - Generics and Biosimilars Initiative. Huge discount on biosimilar infliximab in Norway [www.gabionline.net]. Mol, Belgium: Pro Pharma Communications International; [cited 2015 Jul 3]. Available from: www.gabionline.net/Biosimilars/General/Huge-discount-on-biosimilar-infliximab-in-Norway
4. GaBI Online - Generics and Biosimilars Initiative. Norwegian study may be slowing adoption of biosimilar infliximab [www.gabionline.net]. Mol, Belgium: Pro Pharma Communications International; [cited 2015 Jul 3]. Available from: www.gabionline.net/Biosimilars/News/Norwegian-study-may-be-slowing-adoption-of-biosimilar-infliximab

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Comments (2)

Response to ‘The points of this article is not clear’ posted 23/08/2015 - by GaBI Online Editorial Office

Thank you for your valid and interesting comment. We have updated the content of the paragraph in question. Best Regards, Editorial Assistant

The points of this article is not clear posted 23/08/2015 - by Lawrence

It is said that Somatropin and Filgratstim have high market share in the second paragraph, but give a failure example with Somatropin in the next paragraph. What does the author want to say?